Our silent killer, taking a toll on millions

Published: 8/12/2016 Bangkok Post Newspaper

In a city like Bangkok where bumper-to-bumper traffic, raging heat and all-consuming noise are enough to give you a migraine, a clear city skyline is a welcome view to make you appreciate this bustling city. But hovering over Bangkok and other cities like it, lies a hidden layer that’s affecting the health of millions.

Air pollution is one of the most pressing issues in major Thai cities. A 2015 study by the University of Washington and supported by the World Bank, shows that air pollution causes 50,000 premature deaths in the country yearly. Most at risk are children and the elderly, and people living in areas near coal-fired power plants and polluting industries. At the heart of it is the invisible and harmful pollutant, PM2.5.

Measuring less than 2.5 micrometres in diameter — less than the width of a single human hair — particulate matter (PM) 2.5 is the worst form of air pollution. PM2.5 penetrates deeply into the lungs, allowing harmful chemicals to be carried into internal organs; and is attributed to causing a wide range of illnesses including cancer, strokes, respiratory diseases, foetal damage and even death.

Globally, air pollution is turning out to be a very serious issue. According to Unicef, it contributes to the deaths of around 600,000 children each year; and a recent World Bank study has shown that total deaths from air pollution have risen in Thailand from roughly 31,000 in 1990 to 48,000 in 2013. In fact, Thailand’s Pollution Control Department has identified ground-level ozone and airborne particles as the two pollutants that pose the greatest threats to human health.

Unfortunately, PM2.5 levels in many parts of Thailand are way above acceptable levels. The annual safe limit according to Thailand’s National Ambient Air Quality Standard is at 25 microgrammes per cubic metre, a figure Thailand’s major cities have failed to reach for the past several years. Greenpeace Southeast Asia recently looked into this. Our recent report ranked Thai cities according to their PM2.5 readings — the first of its kind for the country — and what we found highlights the hidden public health crisis we have on our hands.

Based on 2015 data, out of 29 provinces that are equipped with air monitoring stations, 23 exceeded the average annual particulate matter of less than 10 micrometres (PM10) levels. Between January-May this year, the five cities with the highest annual average concentrations of PM2.5 were Chiang Mai, Khon Kaen, Lampang, Bangkok and Ratchaburi. This means, that there are levels reaching into “unhealthy”, “very unhealthy” and “hazardous” levels, according to the World Health Organisation. If you want a real-time measurement of what we’re breathing, there is a website that you can check out the visual map, just key “Bangkok AQI”.

So why isn’t the Thai government factoring in PM2.5? Many other countries such as China and India have already incorporated PM2.5 in their air quality indexes, and PM2.5 concentrations are crucial in determining the country’s smog and pollution alerts. In Beijing, residents are advised to wear masks and avoid outdoor activities in similar circumstances. In Delhi, a severe bout of smog enveloped the city and the government was forced to temporarily shut down schools. But the same warnings or measures are not in place in Thailand.

The country is well equipped to do so though. Although pollution monitoring stations are capable of measuring PM2.5 concentrations, Thailand’s Air Quality Index (AQI) does not factor it in. While the AQI provides Thais with timely and reliable information about air pollution levels, it only considers PM10 (larger dust particles). Comparatively, the World Health Organisation also uses PM2.5 AQI values, rather than PM10, to more accurately judge potential health effects from pollution.

So if PM2.5 can give us a better understanding of pollution and the toll it takes on human lives, why is this silent killer hidden from official data? The unfettered growth of industries, the construction of even more coal-fired power plants, the addition of more vehicles on our roads, and the unsolved haze problem from Indonesia affecting Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries will mean pollution will certainly worsen in the coming years.

To protect people’s health, the Thai government needs to urgently upgrade the AQI to include PM2.5. Additionally, it should strengthen pollution monitoring and regulation of existing coal plants and shift away from the use of coal. PM2.5 and mercury emissions should be measured at source, and the current standards for other toxic pollutants such as sulphur oxides and nitrous oxides, aside from dust emissions should be reviewed.

Legal protection for the right to clean air in Thailand is inadequate and will remain so as long as the government continues to sacrifice public health whenever it is perceived to come into conflict with industry. The Thai government must take a step back from this myopic approach and tackle the issue from a public health perspective. The government must challenge industry to meet better standards through innovation — and thus pave the way for a sustainable approach to pollution prevention.

ฝุ่นพิษ PM2.5 ที่คุกคามสุขภาพของคนในกรุงเทพฯ มาจากไหน

D5E4220F-2AA1-46A3-8894-FD251996C23Cแหล่งกำเนิด PM2.5 มีทั้งแบบปล่อยโดยตรงกับแหล่งกำเนิดปฐมภูมิ ไม่ว่าจะเป็นการคมนาคมขนส่ง การผลิตไฟฟ้า การเผาในที่โล่งและอุตสาหกรรมการผลิต ขึ้นอยู่กับว่าพื้นที่ใดมีแหล่งกำเนิดแบบใดเป็นหลัก(Primary PM2.5 และจากปฏิกิริยาเคมีในบรรยากาศโดยมีสารกลุ่มซัลเฟอร์หรือกลุ่มไนโตรเจนและแอมโมเนียเป็นสารตั้งต้น(Secondary PM2.5) ดังนั้น การปล่อยซัลเฟอร์ไดออกไซด์และออกไซด์ของไนโตรเจนจากแหล่งกำเนิดต่างๆ โดยเฉพาะการผลิตไฟฟ้าจากฟอสซิลและการผลิตทางอุตสาหกรรม เมื่อเกิดการรวมตัวกันในบรรยากาศจะมีผลต่อการก่อตัวของ PM2.5 ขั้นทุติยภูมิอีกด้วย

หลายคนมักจะพูดถึงการเผาในที่โล่งว่าเป็นสาเหตุสำคัญประการหนึ่ง ในช่วงระยะเวลานี้ แต่จากข้อมูลดาวเทียม จุดเกิดความร้อนที่เกิดขึ้นในรอบ 24 ชั่วโมงที่ผ่านมาในเขตประเทศไทยมีน้อยมาก ดังนั้น PM2.5 จากการเผาในที่โล่งนั้นจึงไม่ใช่ปัจจัยหลัก เราไม่ควรโยนความผิดให้เกษตรกรที่มักถูกกล่าวหาว่าเป็นต้นเหตุ

แผนที่แสดงจุดความร้อนสะสมย้อนหลัง 24 ชั่วโมง(10-11 กุมภาพันธ์ 2561)
ที่แปลผลจากภาพถ่ายดาวเทียม(http://fire.gistda.or.th)

ดังนั้น ในช่วงนี้ ฝุ่นพิษ PM2.5 ที่คุกคามสุขภาพของคนกรุงเทพฯ ก็ต้องมุ่งตรงไปที่แหล่งกำเนิดจากการคมนาคมขนส่ง(ให้นึกภาพถึงรถยนต์ส่วนตัวนับล้านคันบนถนน) และการเคลื่อนตัวของมลพิษจากพื้นที่อื่นๆ เช่น ผลการคำนวณแบบจำลองบรรยากาศ (Atmospheric Modeling) ที่ดำเนินการโดยทีมวิจัย Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling ของมหาวิทยาลัยฮาร์วาร์ด โดยใช้เครื่องมือที่เรียกว่าแบบจำลองการเคลื่อนที่ของเคมีในบรรยากาศ (Atmospheric chemistry-transport model- GEOS-Chem) ซึ่งระบุว่า….”โรงไฟฟ้าถ่านหินบีแอลซีพีและเก็คโค-วัน ยังส่งผลกระทบต่อคุณภาพอากาศของแหล่งท่องเที่ยวบริเวณใกล้เคียงอย่างเกาะเสม็ด เกาะแสมสารและพัทยา รวมทั้งกรุงเทพมหานคร โดยเฉพาะอย่างยิ่งในช่วงเดือนกุมภาพันธ์ถึงกันยายน เมื่อลมพัดจากทางทิศใต้มายังทิศตะวันตกเฉียงใต้(ดูภาพแรกแสดงทิศทางของกระแสลม) และในช่วงสภาวะอากาศที่แย่ที่สุด ในแต่ละวันฝุ่นละอองขนาดเล็กไม่เกิน 2.5 ไมครอนจากโรงไฟฟ้าถ่านหินทั้งสองแห่งสามารถแพร่ กระจายเข้าสู่พื้นที่แหล่งท่องเที่ยวในสัดส่วนร้อยละ 40 และในเขตกรุงเทพมหานครร้อยละ 20 เมื่อเปรียบเทียบกับค่าเฉลี่ยรายปี”

สนธิ คชวัฒน์ เลขาธิการชมรมนักวิชาการสิ่งแวดล้อมไทย กล่าวว่า “กรุงเทพมหานครช่วงที่ผ่านมามีสภาพอากาศนิ่ง การฟุ้งกระจายในแนวราบไม่ระบาย มีลมสงบความเร็วลมต่ำ และการฟุ้งกระจายในแนวดิ่งมีน้อย หรืออีกนัยหนึ่ง การเกิดมีสภาพอากาศเย็นหรืออุณภูมิต่ำที่พื้นดินรวมทั้งมีละอองน้ำหรือหมอกปกคลุมเหนือพื้นดินจำนวนมาก แต่ที่ระดับความสูงขึ้นไปอากาศกลับมีอุณภูมิสูงขึ้นเนื่องจากความร้อนจากดวงอาทิตย์ จึงทำให้มลพิษที่พื้นดิน เช่น ฝุ่นละอองขนาดเล็ก สารเบนซิน ก๊าซคาร์บอนมอนอกไซด์ เป็นต้น ที่ออกมาจากท่อไอเสียรถยนต์ซึ่งมีความร้อนมากกว่าอากาศโดยรอบจะเคลื่อนที่ลอยขึ้น(จากร้อนไปเย็น) ในระดับหนึ่งแล้วลอยต่อไปไม่ได้เนื่องจากไปปะทะละอองน้ำและความร้อนจากดวงอาทิตย์ที่อุณหภูมิสูงกว่าจึงตกลงมาปกคลุมพื้นที่ใกล้เคียงทำให้มีค่ามลพิษเกินมาตรฐานบริเวณริมถนนซึ่งเปรียบเสมือนเอาฝาชีทึบครอบอาหารร้อนๆไว้ ความร้อนก็จะกระจายอยู่ในฝาชีนั่นเอง”

กรุงเทพเป็นพื้นที่ราบ อิทธิพลของลมมรสุมช่วยกระจายให้ฝุ่นละอองและมลพิษทางอากาศ เคลื่อนตัวออกไปได้ง่าย แต่เมื่อพิจารณาถึงคุณลักษณะที่สำคัญของมลพิษทางอากาศ PM2.5 ซึ่งสามารถเคลื่อนย้ายจากแหล่งกำเนิดไปในระยะไกลนับร้อยนับพันกิโลเมตรได้ แหล่งกำเนิด PM2.5 ขนาดใหญ่อื่นๆ เช่น โรงไฟฟ้าถ่านหิน การผลิตทางอุตสาหกรรม เป็นต้น จึงมีส่วนสำคัญและส่งผลต่อคุณภาพอากาศในกรุงเทพมหานครภายใต้สภาวะทางอุตุนิยมวิทยา(ลม อุณหภูมิ ความกดอากาศ ความชื้น) และช่วงเวลาที่เหมาะสม

บทความโดย ธารา บัวคำศรี ผู้อำนวยการประจำประเทศไทย กรีนพีซ เอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้

Right to Clean Air – The Art Exhibition

คำกล่าวเปิดงาน Right to Clean Air – The Art Exhibition

คุณฉัตรชัย พรหมทัตตะเวที ผู้อำนวยการหอศิลปวัฒนธรรมแห่งกรุงเทพมหานคร พ่อแม่พี่น้องจากตำบลมะเกลือเมืองนครสวรรค์ ท่านผู้มีเกียรติ วิทยากรผู้ทรงคุณวุฒิ สื่อมวลชนทุกท่าน

คำถามสองคำถามผุดขี้นในช่วงสองสามปีที่ผ่านมา เมื่อเราพูดถึงฝุ่นละอองขนาดเล็กมากๆ ชนิดที่เรียกว่าตาเปล่ามองไม่เห็น คือ เราจะรู้และทำให้คนเข้าใจได้อย่างไร คำตอบก็คือ เราต้องเข้าไปสังเกตในระยะใกล้มากๆ ซึ่งมักทำได้โดยใช้เครื่องมือวัดที่ละเอียดมากๆ หรือไม่ เราก็ต้องออกไปไกลให้มากพอที่จะเห็นภาพรวมทั้งหมด จากชานเมืองมองเข้ามาในเมือง จากที่สูงมองลงมาในเมือง/ในเขตอุตสาหกรรม ในวันที่อากาศแย่ๆ เราจะเห็นฝุ่นควัน smog ซึ่งมี PM2.5 เป็นส่วนประกอบสำคัญ

ในยุคที่การสำรวจระยะไกลพัฒนาไปอย่างไร้เทียมทาน มนุษย์ได้มีโอกาสเห็นขอบเขต ความเข้มข้น การกระจายตัวของมลพิษทางอากาศจากภาพถ่ายดาวเทียมที่โคจรรอบโลก ข้อมูลปริมาณมหาศาลที่ประมวลมาเป็นกราฟฟิกและก่อรูปมาเป็นข้อเสนอเชิงนโยบายกลายมาเป็นกฏเกณฑ์ ข้อบังคับและกฏหมายเพื่อต่อกรกับวิกฤตมลพิษทางอากาศในประเทศต่างๆ

เราตอบคำถามแรกได้ไม่ยากนัก แต่คำถามอีกหนึ่งชุด มีความท้าทายอย่างยิ่ง กล่าวคือ เราสามารถสร้างแรงบันดาลใจ ผลสะเทือนที่เกิดจากความมุ่งมั่นของผู้คนจำนวนมากเพื่อสร้างการเปลี่ยนแปลงไปสู่อนาคตที่เราต้องการ ในที่นี้คือ อากาศที่ดี ได้อย่างไร

แม้ว่าข้อมูล หลักฐานทางวิทยาศาสตร์ว่าด้วย PM2.5 จะชัดเจนเพิ่มมากขึ้น รัฐบาล ผู้กำหนดนโยบาย รวมถึงผู้ก่อมลพิษเองจะตอบรับกับกระแส “เป้าหมายการพัฒนาที่ยั่งยืน” ที่ถาโถมเข้ามาอย่างไม่ค่อยจะเต็มใจนัก และสุดท้ายก็จะพูดว่า เราต้องเอาบรรยากาศการลงทุนเป็นตัวตั้ง เราแทบจะไม่ได้ทำอะไรเลยเพื่อปกป้องสุขภาพอนามัยและคุณภาพชีวิตที่ดีของผู้คน ยังไม่ต้องไปนึกถึงคนที่ต้องอาศัยในพื้นที่ที่ปนเปื้อนมลพิษและสูดหายใจเข้าไปทุกวัน สิ่งที่เป็นอยู่คือการปล่อยมลพิษที่ถูกกฎหมาย(legalized pollution)

Right to Clean Air – the Art Exhibition ครั้งนี้นำเสนอเรื่องราวผ่านงานศิลปะโดยคุณโจ้ เรืองศักดิ์ อนุวัตรวิมล กรีนพีซขอขอบคุณอย่างยิ่งสำหรับการอุทิศตนเพื่อเปิดให้เราได้ “สนทนากับสังคม” อย่างกว้างขวางและลึกซึ้ง ขอบคุณหอศิลปะวัฒนธรรมแห่ง กทม. แรงงานแห่งความรักของเจ้าหน้าที่และอาสาสมัครของกรีนพีซที่ทำงานกันอย่างไม่รู้จักเหน็ดเหนื่อยในช่วงปีที่ผ่านมา เพื่อช่วยให้พวกเราตอบคำถามที่สองว่าด้วยการสร้างความเปลี่ยนแปลงชุดความคิดของผู้คนในสังคมอันท้าทายยิ่ง

มีคำกล่าวที่ว่า ตลอดห้วงระยะเวลาประวัติศาสตร์ของมนุษย์ การเปลี่ยนแปลงขั้นรากฐานในสังคมมิได้มาจากคำสั่ง/อำนาจของรัฐบาล และผลของการสู้รบ หากมาจากผู้คนทั้งหลายเปลี่ยนแปลงความคิดตนเอง บางครั้ง แม้เพียงเล็กน้อยก็ตาม

เราก็เชื่อมั่นเช่นนั้น

ฆาตรกรเงียบ คร่าชีวิตนับล้าน

บทความนี้แปลจากต้นฉบับภาษาอังกฤษ Our silent killer, taking a toll on millions เผยแพร่ครั้งแรกที่สำนักข่าว Bangkok Post เมื่อ 8 ธันวาคม 2559

ในปี 2558 มาตรวัดทางวิทยาศาสตร์แสดงให้เห็น 5 จังหวัด ที่มีมลพิษทางอากาศเกินค่ามาตรฐาน ได้แก่ เชียงใหม่ ขอนแก่น ลำปาง กรุงเทพมหานคร และราชบุรี ตามลำดับ

ในเมืองที่สภาพการจราจรเป็นแบบกันชนถึงกันชนอย่างกรุงเทพฯ ความร้อนอันรุนแรง และเสียงที่กลืนกินทุกอย่าง ก็เพียงพอที่จะทำให้คุณเป็นไมเกรนได้ เส้นขอบฟ้าไร้เมฆหมอกเป็นทิวทัศน์ที่คอยอยู่ตอนรับให้คุณได้ชื่นชมเมืองที่วุ่นวายเมืองนี้ แต่ยังมีสิ่งที่คอยส่งผลต่อสุขภาพของคนนับล้าน ล่องลอยอยู่อย่างลับๆ เหนือกรุงเทพฯ และเมืองอื่นๆ ที่คล้ายกัน

มลพิษทางอากาศเป็นหนึ่งในประเด็นเร่งด่วนที่สุดสำหรับเมืองใหญ่ๆในประเทศไทย งานวิจัยปี 2558 ฉบับหนึ่ง ซึ่งจัดทำโดยมหาวิทยาลัยวอชิงตัน และมีธนาคารโลกเป็นผู้สนับสนุน แสดงให้เห็นว่ามลพิษทางอากาศส่งผลให้เกิดการเสียชีวิตก่อนวัยอันควร ถึง 50,000 ราย ในประเทศต่อปี กลุ่มที่สุ่มเสี่ยงที่สุดคือเด็ก คนชรา และประชาชนที่อาศัยอยู่ในบริเวณใกล้โรงไฟฟ้าถ่านหินหรือโรงงานที่ปล่อยมลพิษต่างๆ โดยมีสิ่งที่มองไม่เห็นและสารพิษอันตรายเป็นหัวใจหลัก นั่นก็คือ ฝุ่นละอองขนาดเล็กไม่เกิน 2.5 ไมครอน(PM2.5)

ด้วยเส้นผ่านศูนย์กลางขนาดเล็กไม่เกิน 2.5 ไมครอน เล็กกว่าความกว้างของเส้นผมมนุษย์ PM2.5 นั้น เป็นรูปแบบของมลพิษทางอากาศที่เลวร้ายที่สุด PM2.5 ช่วยทำให้สารเคมีอันตรายชนิดต่างๆ สามารถแทรกซึมลึกเข้าไปในปอด และส่งต่อให้อวัยวะภายในอื่นๆ ก่อให้เกิดโรคหลายประเภท ที่รวมถึง โรคมะเร็ง โรคหลอดเลือดสมอง โรคทางระบบหายใจ ความเสี่ยงที่จะเกิดอันตรายต่อทารกในครรภ์ และอาจถึงตายได้

มลพิษทางอากาศกำลังกลายเป็นปัญหาใหญ่ของทั้งโลก Unicef เผยว่ามลพิษทางอากาศมีส่วนทำให้เกิดการตายของเด็กประมาณ 60,000 คนต่อปี และงานวิจัยของธนาคารโลกได้ชี้ให้เห็นว่า อัตราการตายจากมลพิษทางอากาศของไทยได้เพิ่มขึ้นโดยคร่าวๆจาก 31,000 ราย ในปี 2533 ไปเป็น 48,000 ราย ในปี 2556 ในความเป็นจริง ข้อมูลจากกรมควบคุมมลพิษระบุว่าก๊าซโอโซนพื้นผิวและฝุ่นละอองคือมลพิษสองชนิดหลักที่เป็นภัยคุกคามร้ายแรงที่สุดต่อ สุขภาพอนามัยของคนในประเทศไทย

โชคไม่ดีนักที่ระดับ PM2.5 ในหลายส่วนของประเทศไทย มีปริมาณมากเกินจะยอมรับได้ ความเข้มข้นเฉลี่ยรายปีของ PM2.5 ในบรรยากาศที่กำหนดเป็นมาตรฐานคุณภาพอากาศของประเทศไทย คือ 25 ไมโครกรัมต่อลูกบาศก์เมตร ตัวเลขที่ไทยล้มเหลวที่จะควบคุมในหลายปีที่ผ่านมา ไม่นานมานี้ทางกรีนพีซเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ได้ตรวจสอบ และเผยอันดับเมืองต่างๆของไทยตามค่า PM2.5 อ้างอิงจากข้อมูลจากกรมควบคุมมลพิษ ซึ่งถือเป็นครั้งแรกของประเทศที่มีการจัดในรูปแบบนี้ และสิ่งที่เราพบได้เน้นให้เห็นถึงวิกฤตใกล้ตัว ซึ่งเป็นภัยเงียบที่ซ้อนเร้นต่อสุขภาพของทุกคน

อ้างอิงจากข้อมูลเมื่อปี 2558 ปรากฏว่าจากทั้งหมด 29 จังหวัด ที่มีการติดตั้งการตรวจวัดทางอากาศ มีทั้งหมด 23 จังหวัด ที่มีค่าฝุ่นพิษ PM10 มากกว่าค่าเฉลี่ยประจำปี โดยระหว่างเดือนมกราคมถึงพฤษภาคมปีนี้ มี 5 จังหวัด ที่มีค่าเฉลี่ยของความหนาแน่นของ PM2.5 สูงสุดได้แก่ เชียงใหม่ ขอนแก่น ลำปาง กรุงเทพมหานคร และราชบุรี กล่าวคือ ค่ามลพิษใน 5 จังหวัดนั้นมีถึงระดับที่เป็นพิษ เป็นพิษอย่างมาก และระดับอันตรายตามที่องค์การอนามัยโลกได้จัดไว้ หากคุณต้องการจะรู้ว่าเรากำลังหายใจอะไรเข้าไปบ้างแบบนาทีต่อนาที มีเว็บไซท์ที่แสดงผลเป็นแผนภาพให้คุณ เพียงแค่พิมพ์ “Bangkok AQI”

แล้วทำไมรัฐบาลไทยถึงไม่ใช้ค่าเฉลี่ย PM 2.5 ในการคำนวณดัชนีคุณภาพด้วย?  หลายประเทศ เช่น จีนและอินเดียได้รวม PM2.5 เข้าไปในดัชนีคุณภาพอากาศแล้ว และความหนาแน่นของ PM2.5 ก็สำคัญต่อการบ่งชี้ปริมาณ รวมถึงสัญญาณเตือนหมอกควันและมลพิษของประเทศ ที่กรุงปักกิ่งมีการแนะนำให้ผู้พักอาศัยใส่หน้ากากและหลีกเลี่ยงกิจกรรมภายนอกอาคาร ส่วนกรุงนิวเดลี ทางรัฐบาลถูกบังคับให้ปิดโรงเรียนชั่วคราว เนื่องจากปริมาณหมอกควันพิษขั้นรุนแรงที่ปกคลุมเมือง แต่ประเทศไทยกลับไม่มีการเตือนภัยหรือการวัดผลในแบบดังกล่าวเลย

จริงๆแล้วประเทศของเรามีเครื่องมือที่จะทำแบบนั้นได้ ถึงแม้ว่า สถานีเฝ้าระวังมลพิษจะสามารถวัดค่าความหนาแน่น PM2.5 ได้ แต่กลับไม่ได้มีมันอยู่ในดัชนีคุณภาพอากาศของไทย (AQI) ขณะที่ AQI นั้นสามารถให้ข้อมูลเกี่ยวกับระดับมลพิษทางอากาศที่เป็นเวลาและเชื่อถือได้ มีเพียงแค่ PM10 (ฝุ่นละอองที่ใหญ่กว่า) ที่ถูกวัด  ซึ่งทางองค์การอนามัยโลกได้ให้ความสำคัญกับค่า PM2.5 มากกว่า PM10 เพื่อการคำนวนแนวโน้มผลกระทบต่อสุขภาพจากมลภาวะที่มีประสิทธิภาพมากกว่า

เพราะฉะนั้น หาก PM2.5 สามารถช่วยให้เรามีความเข้าใจต่อมลพิษและค่าเสียหายที่เกิดขึ้นต่อชีวิตมนุษย์เราได้ดีกว่า ทำไมฆาตกรเงียบนี้ถึงถูกซ่อนจากเอกสารทางการ? การเพิ่มขึ้นอย่างอิสระของโรงงานอุตสาหกรรม การจัดสร้างโรงไฟฟ้าถ่านหินให้มีจำนวนมากขึ้นไปอีก การเพิ่มปริมาณรถยนต์สู่ถนนของเรา รวมถึงปัญหาค้างคาของประเทศอินโดนีเซียที่ส่งผลกับไทยและประเทศอื่นๆในเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ จนกลายเป็นปัญหามลพิษข้ามพรมแดน จะนำไปสู่ประเด็นมลภาวะที่แย่ลงในปีถัดจากนี้อย่างแน่นอน

รัฐบาลไทยจำเป็นจะต้องยกระดับ AQI ให้รวม PM2.5 เข้าไปด้วยอย่างเร่งด่วน นอกจากนั้นควรมีมาตรการเฝ้าระวังมลพิษและกฎเกณฑ์ข้อปฏิบัติของโรงไฟฟ้าถ่านหินที่มีอยู่ให้เคร่งครัดยิ่งขึ้น ซึ่งรวมถึงการเปลี่ยนเลิกใช้ถ่านหินด้วยเช่นกันเพื่อปกป้องสุขภาพของประชาชน และควรมีการวัดการปล่อย PM2.5 และปรอทที่แหล่งกำเนิด และมาตรฐานปัจจุบันสำหรับสารพิษอื่นๆ เช่น ซัลเฟอร์ไดออกไซด์ และไนตรัสออกไซด์ นอกเหนือไปจากการปล่อยฝุ่นละออง ควรมีการพิจารณาใหม่อีกครั้ง

การคุ้มครองทางกฎหมายสำหรับสิทธิในการเข้าถึงอากาศสะอาดในประเทศไทยนั้นไม่เพียงพอ และจะยังเป็นแบบนี้ต่อไปหากรัฐบาลยืดเยื้อ และเลือกที่จะยอมแลกเรื่องสาธารณสุขของประชาชนทุกครั้งที่มีขัดแย้งกับทางอุตสาหกรรม รัฐบาลไทยต้องถอยออกมาจากการมองโลกในวิสัยทัศน์แคบๆ และจัดการกับประเด็นปัญหาเหล่านี้จากมุมมองด้านสาธารณสุข  รัฐบาลควรจะกระตุ้นให้ทางอุตสาหกรรมดำเนินงานภายใต้มาตรฐานที่ดีกว่านี้ ผ่านทางนวัตกรรมต่างๆ และเพื่อเบิกทางให้กับการป้องกันมลพิษอย่างยั่งยืน

Our silent killer, taking a toll on millions

Tara Buakamsri 

Published in Bangkok Post, 8 December 2016

In a city like Bangkok where bumper-to-bumper traffic, raging heat and all-consuming noise are enough to give you a migraine, a clear city skyline is a welcome view to make you appreciate this bustling city. But hovering over Bangkok and other cities like it, lies a hidden layer that’s affecting the health of millions.

Air pollution is one of the most pressing issues in major Thai cities. A 2015 study by the University of Washington and supported by the World Bank, shows that air pollution causes 50,000 premature deaths in the country yearly. Most at risk are children and the elderly, and people living in areas near coal-fired power plants and polluting industries. At the heart of it is the invisible and harmful pollutant, PM2.5.

Measuring less than 2.5 micrometres in diameter — less than the width of a single human hair — particulate matter (PM) 2.5 is the worst form of air pollution. PM2.5 penetrates deeply into the lungs, allowing harmful chemicals to be carried into internal organs; and is attributed to causing a wide range of illnesses including cancer, strokes, respiratory diseases, foetal damage and even death.

Globally, air pollution is turning out to be a very serious issue. According to Unicef, it contributes to the deaths of around 600,000 children each year; and a recent World Bank study has shown that total deaths from air pollution have risen in Thailand from roughly 31,000 in 1990 to 48,000 in 2013. In fact, Thailand’s Pollution Control Department has identified ground-level ozone and airborne particles as the two pollutants that pose the greatest threats to human health.

Unfortunately, PM2.5 levels in many parts of Thailand are way above acceptable levels. The annual safe limit according to Thailand’s National Ambient Air Quality Standard is at 25 microgrammes per cubic metre, a figure Thailand’s major cities have failed to reach for the past several years. Greenpeace Southeast Asia recently looked into this. Our recent report ranked Thai cities according to their PM2.5 readings — the first of its kind for the country — and what we found highlights the hidden public health crisis we have on our hands.

Based on 2015 data, out of 29 provinces that are equipped with air monitoring stations, 23 exceeded the average annual particulate matter of less than 10 micrometres (PM10) levels. Between January-May this year, the five cities with the highest annual average concentrations of PM2.5 were Chiang Mai, Khon Kaen, Lampang, Bangkok and Ratchaburi. This means, that there are levels reaching into “unhealthy”, “very unhealthy” and “hazardous” levels, according to the World Health Organisation. If you want a real-time measurement of what we’re breathing, there is a website that you can check out the visual map, just key “Bangkok AQI”.

So why isn’t the Thai government factoring in PM2.5? Many other countries such as China and India have already incorporated PM2.5 in their air quality indexes, and PM2.5 concentrations are crucial in determining the country’s smog and pollution alerts. In Beijing, residents are advised to wear masks and avoid outdoor activities in similar circumstances. In Delhi, a severe bout of smog enveloped the city and the government was forced to temporarily shut down schools. But the same warnings or measures are not in place in Thailand.

The country is well equipped to do so though. Although pollution monitoring stations are capable of measuring PM2.5 concentrations, Thailand’s Air Quality Index (AQI) does not factor it in. While the AQI provides Thais with timely and reliable information about air pollution levels, it only considers PM10 (larger dust particles). Comparatively, the World Health Organisation also uses PM2.5 AQI values, rather than PM10, to more accurately judge potential health effects from pollution.

So if PM2.5 can give us a better understanding of pollution and the toll it takes on human lives, why is this silent killer hidden from official data? The unfettered growth of industries, the construction of even more coal-fired power plants, the addition of more vehicles on our roads, and the unsolved haze problem from Indonesia affecting Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries will mean pollution will certainly worsen in the coming years.

To protect people’s health, the Thai government needs to urgently upgrade the AQI to include PM2.5. Additionally, it should strengthen pollution monitoring and regulation of existing coal plants and shift away from the use of coal. PM2.5 and mercury emissions should be measured at source, and the current standards for other toxic pollutants such as sulphur oxides and nitrous oxides, aside from dust emissions should be reviewed.

Legal protection for the right to clean air in Thailand is inadequate and will remain so as long as the government continues to sacrifice public health whenever it is perceived to come into conflict with industry. The Thai government must take a step back from this myopic approach and tackle the issue from a public health perspective. The government must challenge industry to meet better standards through innovation — and thus pave the way for a sustainable approach to pollution prevention.

หมอกมรณะจาก PM2.5 ปกคลุมกรุงเตหะราน

tehran_amo_2016314

หมอกควันพิษในระดับสูงที่ไม่เคยมีมาก่อนเข้าปกคลุมกรุงเตหะรานในช่วงสัปดาห์นี้ จากรายงาน มีคนนับร้อยเสียชีวิตและจำต้องปิดโรงเรียน

ภายถ่ายดาวเทียม Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) จาก NASA’s Aqua จับภาพสีธรรมชาติของหมอกควันพิษในวันที่ 9 พฤศจิกายน 2559 ภาพแสดงหมอกควันพิษสีซีดปกคลุมเหนือกรุงเตหะราน ทางด้านใต้ของแนวเทือกเขา Alborz ฝุ่นละอองขนาดเล็กไม่เกิน 2.5 ไมครอน Fine airborne particles  หรือ PM2.5 มีความเข้มข้นมากกว่า 150 ไมโครกรัมต่อลูกบาศก์เมตรในช่วงสัปดาห์นี้ ความเข้มข้นระหว่าง 101 ถึง 150 นั้นถือว่ามีผลกระทบต่อสุขภาพโดยเฉพาะในผู้สูงอายุและเด็ก มีคนมากกว่า 400 คนเสียชีวิตจากมลพิษทางอากาศในกรุงเตหะรานในช่วงเดือนที่ผ่านมาจากรายงานข่าว news reports. โรงเรียนในกรุงเตหะรานต้องหยุดการเรียนการสอนลง

“ในช่วงสองสามวันที่ผ่านมา มันแย่มากๆ ” Amin Dezfuli นักวิทยาศาสตร์ด้านบรรยากาศจาก NASA ที่อาศัยในเตหะรานช่วงปี 2544-2549 กล่าว “นี่เป็นเหตุผลหนึ่งที่ผมออกจากเตหะราน”

ช่วงที่ Dezfuli อยู่ในเตหะราน โรงเรียนหยุดการเรียนการสอนอันเนื่องมาจากปัญหามลพิษนั้นยังไม่มี เมื่อคุณภาพอากาศเลวร้ายลง มีวันที่มีอากาศดีๆ เพียงไม่กี่วัน ตามข้อมูลจาก การศึกษาวิจัย มาตราฐานการปล่อยไอเสียจากยานยนต์นั้นหย่อยยานมาก นอกจากนี้ การขนส่งสาธารณะนั้นขยายตัวตามการเพิ่มของประชากร แหล่งกำเนิดหลักของมลพิษทางอากาศนั้นรวมถึงการปล่อยมลพิษจากรถยนต์ รถบรรทุกและรถจักรยานยนต์

ในช่วงฤดุหนาว การผกผันของอุณหภูมินั้นทำให้ปัญหาหมอกควันพิษเลวร้ายลง ชั้นของบรรยากาศที่อุ่นกว่าเป็นตัวกักอากาศเย็นที่มีความเข้มข้นและเจือปนด้วยสารพิษ ส่วนเทือกเขาที่รายล้อมเมืองก็ยังทำให้มลพิษสะสมตัวอยู่ในหุบเขามากขึ้น

เอกสารอ้างอิง :

NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using MODIS data from LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response. Caption by Pola Lem.

หมอกควันพิษภาคเหนือตอนบนปี 2559

Screen Shot 2559-04-19 at 9.59.24 PMสถานการณ์ฝุ่นละอองที่รายงานโดยกรมควบคุมมลพิษตั้งแต่ต้นปี 2559 ที่ผ่านมา เป็นการรายงานการวัดความเข้มข้นของฝุ่นละอองขนาดเล็กไม่เกิน 10 ไมครอน(PM10) ความเข้มข้นมันพุ่งทะลุค่ามาตรฐาน(120 ไมโครกรัมต่อลบ.ม.) เป็นช่วงๆ มาจนถึงปัจจุบัน เชียงรายเจอหนักสุด ค่าความเข้มข้นสูงสุดของ PM10 ขึ้นเป็นสองเท่ากว่าค่ามาตรฐาน ‪#‎prayformaesai‬

Screen Shot 2559-04-19 at 9.59.57 PM

เมื่อดูวิสัยทัศน์ “ภูมิภาคอาเซียนปลอดหมอกควันภายในปี 2563” ที่มีดัชนีชี้วัด 3 อัน ดูแล้ว ผมไม่ค่อยแน่ใจว่ามันจะทำได้จริงตามนั้น เพราะหมอกควันพิษจากการเกิดไฟจะยังคงอยู่ต่อไปตราบเท่าที่ไม่มีการแก้ปัญหาที่รากเหง้า
ปัญหารากเหง้าประการสำคัญอันหนึ่งคือ “การครอบงำของบรรษัท/เจ้าสัว/” ยิ่งในยุค “ประชารัฐ” นี้ด้วยแล้ว ยิ่งฝังรากลึกมากและสยายปีกไปทั่วทั้งองคาพยพของสังคม และคววบคุมห่วงโซ่อุปทานไว้หมด ในขณะที่จริตของสังคมไทยยังคงเป็นเรื่องของการโยนบาปไปให้กับคนตัวเล็กตัวน้อย

13002423_1133405596690723_756448515694853282_o

พิจารณาจากทิศทางลมแล้ว กระแสลมตรงบริเวณตอนเหนือของจังหวัดเชียงรายนั้นนิ่งมาก ความเร็ว 0 หรืออย่างมากไม่เกิน 1-2 เมตรต่อวินาที (พื้นที่ในเฉดสีม่วง) แถมยังเป็นพื้นที่ที่มีการเคลื่อนตัวของอากาศเข้ามาจากทุกด้านเป็นเหตุให้มีการสะสมของฝุ่นละอองจากหมอกควันไฟทั้งในเขตไทยและที่มาจาก สปป ลาว และรัฐฉาน จุดสีส้มแสดงจุดเกิดความร้อน(hotspot)นอกประเทศ ในหลายกรณี จุดเกิดความร้อนไม่ได้หมายถึงจุดเกิดไฟ เซ็นเซอร์ของดาวเทียมจะเก็บข้อมูลไว้หมด

13029706_1133408730023743_6518010687853238949_o

เจอแบบนี้ กรมควบคุมมลพิษควรจะรายงานค่าฝุ่นละอองขนาดเล็กมาก ไม่เกิน 2.5 ไมครอน(PM2.5) เพราะมันเป็นตัวหลักของผลกระทบสุขภาพ PM10 ไม่พอแล้วครับในสถานการณ์แบบนี้

13063125_1133392216692061_1216836645164072893_o

วันที่ 18 เมษายน 2559 ที่ผ่านมา หมอกควันไฟ (ซึ่งจริงๆ สมควรจะเรียกว่าหมอกควันพิษจากการเกิดไฟ) ปกคลุมไปทั่ว ไม่เว้นทั้งในที่ราบหุบเขาและเขตภูเขา รวมถึงในเขต สปป. ลาว ด้านที่ติดกับจังหวัดเชียงราย