Our silent killer, taking a toll on millions

Published: 8/12/2016 Bangkok Post Newspaper

In a city like Bangkok where bumper-to-bumper traffic, raging heat and all-consuming noise are enough to give you a migraine, a clear city skyline is a welcome view to make you appreciate this bustling city. But hovering over Bangkok and other cities like it, lies a hidden layer that’s affecting the health of millions.

Air pollution is one of the most pressing issues in major Thai cities. A 2015 study by the University of Washington and supported by the World Bank, shows that air pollution causes 50,000 premature deaths in the country yearly. Most at risk are children and the elderly, and people living in areas near coal-fired power plants and polluting industries. At the heart of it is the invisible and harmful pollutant, PM2.5.

Measuring less than 2.5 micrometres in diameter — less than the width of a single human hair — particulate matter (PM) 2.5 is the worst form of air pollution. PM2.5 penetrates deeply into the lungs, allowing harmful chemicals to be carried into internal organs; and is attributed to causing a wide range of illnesses including cancer, strokes, respiratory diseases, foetal damage and even death.

Globally, air pollution is turning out to be a very serious issue. According to Unicef, it contributes to the deaths of around 600,000 children each year; and a recent World Bank study has shown that total deaths from air pollution have risen in Thailand from roughly 31,000 in 1990 to 48,000 in 2013. In fact, Thailand’s Pollution Control Department has identified ground-level ozone and airborne particles as the two pollutants that pose the greatest threats to human health.

Unfortunately, PM2.5 levels in many parts of Thailand are way above acceptable levels. The annual safe limit according to Thailand’s National Ambient Air Quality Standard is at 25 microgrammes per cubic metre, a figure Thailand’s major cities have failed to reach for the past several years. Greenpeace Southeast Asia recently looked into this. Our recent report ranked Thai cities according to their PM2.5 readings — the first of its kind for the country — and what we found highlights the hidden public health crisis we have on our hands.

Based on 2015 data, out of 29 provinces that are equipped with air monitoring stations, 23 exceeded the average annual particulate matter of less than 10 micrometres (PM10) levels. Between January-May this year, the five cities with the highest annual average concentrations of PM2.5 were Chiang Mai, Khon Kaen, Lampang, Bangkok and Ratchaburi. This means, that there are levels reaching into “unhealthy”, “very unhealthy” and “hazardous” levels, according to the World Health Organisation. If you want a real-time measurement of what we’re breathing, there is a website that you can check out the visual map, just key “Bangkok AQI”.

So why isn’t the Thai government factoring in PM2.5? Many other countries such as China and India have already incorporated PM2.5 in their air quality indexes, and PM2.5 concentrations are crucial in determining the country’s smog and pollution alerts. In Beijing, residents are advised to wear masks and avoid outdoor activities in similar circumstances. In Delhi, a severe bout of smog enveloped the city and the government was forced to temporarily shut down schools. But the same warnings or measures are not in place in Thailand.

The country is well equipped to do so though. Although pollution monitoring stations are capable of measuring PM2.5 concentrations, Thailand’s Air Quality Index (AQI) does not factor it in. While the AQI provides Thais with timely and reliable information about air pollution levels, it only considers PM10 (larger dust particles). Comparatively, the World Health Organisation also uses PM2.5 AQI values, rather than PM10, to more accurately judge potential health effects from pollution.

So if PM2.5 can give us a better understanding of pollution and the toll it takes on human lives, why is this silent killer hidden from official data? The unfettered growth of industries, the construction of even more coal-fired power plants, the addition of more vehicles on our roads, and the unsolved haze problem from Indonesia affecting Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries will mean pollution will certainly worsen in the coming years.

To protect people’s health, the Thai government needs to urgently upgrade the AQI to include PM2.5. Additionally, it should strengthen pollution monitoring and regulation of existing coal plants and shift away from the use of coal. PM2.5 and mercury emissions should be measured at source, and the current standards for other toxic pollutants such as sulphur oxides and nitrous oxides, aside from dust emissions should be reviewed.

Legal protection for the right to clean air in Thailand is inadequate and will remain so as long as the government continues to sacrifice public health whenever it is perceived to come into conflict with industry. The Thai government must take a step back from this myopic approach and tackle the issue from a public health perspective. The government must challenge industry to meet better standards through innovation — and thus pave the way for a sustainable approach to pollution prevention.

Our silent killer, taking a toll on millions

Tara Buakamsri 

Published in Bangkok Post, 8 December 2016

In a city like Bangkok where bumper-to-bumper traffic, raging heat and all-consuming noise are enough to give you a migraine, a clear city skyline is a welcome view to make you appreciate this bustling city. But hovering over Bangkok and other cities like it, lies a hidden layer that’s affecting the health of millions.

Air pollution is one of the most pressing issues in major Thai cities. A 2015 study by the University of Washington and supported by the World Bank, shows that air pollution causes 50,000 premature deaths in the country yearly. Most at risk are children and the elderly, and people living in areas near coal-fired power plants and polluting industries. At the heart of it is the invisible and harmful pollutant, PM2.5.

Measuring less than 2.5 micrometres in diameter — less than the width of a single human hair — particulate matter (PM) 2.5 is the worst form of air pollution. PM2.5 penetrates deeply into the lungs, allowing harmful chemicals to be carried into internal organs; and is attributed to causing a wide range of illnesses including cancer, strokes, respiratory diseases, foetal damage and even death.

Globally, air pollution is turning out to be a very serious issue. According to Unicef, it contributes to the deaths of around 600,000 children each year; and a recent World Bank study has shown that total deaths from air pollution have risen in Thailand from roughly 31,000 in 1990 to 48,000 in 2013. In fact, Thailand’s Pollution Control Department has identified ground-level ozone and airborne particles as the two pollutants that pose the greatest threats to human health.

Unfortunately, PM2.5 levels in many parts of Thailand are way above acceptable levels. The annual safe limit according to Thailand’s National Ambient Air Quality Standard is at 25 microgrammes per cubic metre, a figure Thailand’s major cities have failed to reach for the past several years. Greenpeace Southeast Asia recently looked into this. Our recent report ranked Thai cities according to their PM2.5 readings — the first of its kind for the country — and what we found highlights the hidden public health crisis we have on our hands.

Based on 2015 data, out of 29 provinces that are equipped with air monitoring stations, 23 exceeded the average annual particulate matter of less than 10 micrometres (PM10) levels. Between January-May this year, the five cities with the highest annual average concentrations of PM2.5 were Chiang Mai, Khon Kaen, Lampang, Bangkok and Ratchaburi. This means, that there are levels reaching into “unhealthy”, “very unhealthy” and “hazardous” levels, according to the World Health Organisation. If you want a real-time measurement of what we’re breathing, there is a website that you can check out the visual map, just key “Bangkok AQI”.

So why isn’t the Thai government factoring in PM2.5? Many other countries such as China and India have already incorporated PM2.5 in their air quality indexes, and PM2.5 concentrations are crucial in determining the country’s smog and pollution alerts. In Beijing, residents are advised to wear masks and avoid outdoor activities in similar circumstances. In Delhi, a severe bout of smog enveloped the city and the government was forced to temporarily shut down schools. But the same warnings or measures are not in place in Thailand.

The country is well equipped to do so though. Although pollution monitoring stations are capable of measuring PM2.5 concentrations, Thailand’s Air Quality Index (AQI) does not factor it in. While the AQI provides Thais with timely and reliable information about air pollution levels, it only considers PM10 (larger dust particles). Comparatively, the World Health Organisation also uses PM2.5 AQI values, rather than PM10, to more accurately judge potential health effects from pollution.

So if PM2.5 can give us a better understanding of pollution and the toll it takes on human lives, why is this silent killer hidden from official data? The unfettered growth of industries, the construction of even more coal-fired power plants, the addition of more vehicles on our roads, and the unsolved haze problem from Indonesia affecting Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries will mean pollution will certainly worsen in the coming years.

To protect people’s health, the Thai government needs to urgently upgrade the AQI to include PM2.5. Additionally, it should strengthen pollution monitoring and regulation of existing coal plants and shift away from the use of coal. PM2.5 and mercury emissions should be measured at source, and the current standards for other toxic pollutants such as sulphur oxides and nitrous oxides, aside from dust emissions should be reviewed.

Legal protection for the right to clean air in Thailand is inadequate and will remain so as long as the government continues to sacrifice public health whenever it is perceived to come into conflict with industry. The Thai government must take a step back from this myopic approach and tackle the issue from a public health perspective. The government must challenge industry to meet better standards through innovation — and thus pave the way for a sustainable approach to pollution prevention.

Under the Dome ภาพยนตร์สารคดีเรื่องหมอกควันพิษในจีนกลายเป็นความรู้สึกร่วมในสังคมออนไลน์

ธารา บัวคำศรี แปลเรียบเรียงจาก https://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/7757-China-documentary-on-smog-becomes-an-instant-internet-sensation

สารคดีที่ทำโดยอดีตผู้ประกาศข่าว CCTV เรื่องผลกระทบของหมอกควันพิษในปักกิ่งที่มีต่อลูกสาวของเธอ ได้มีคนนับล้านเข้าไปดูหลังจากมีการเผยแพร่ออนไลน์

หลังจากลูกสาวที่ยังอยู่ในครรภ์ของเธอตรวจพบว่ามีเนื้องอก Chai Jing ได้ลาออกจากงานที่โทรทัศน์ CCTV และระดมเงินทุนด้วยตัวเองทำสารคดีเกี่ยวกับหมอกควันพิษของจีนเรื่อง ‘Under the Dome’ ซึ่งใช้เวลา 1ปีเต็ม และนับแต่มีการเปิดตัวสารคดี ได้กลายเป็นความรู้สึกร่วมในโลกออนไลน์

ในวันที่ 1 มีนาคม 2558 Chen Jining รัฐมนตรีสิ่งแวดล้อมซึ่งเพิ่งได้รับตำแหน่งงานได้ 48 ชั่วโมง กล่าวชื่นชม Chai Jing ที่ใช้ประเด็นสุขภาพเพื่อกระตุ้นให้ประชาขนได้ตระหนักเรื่องสิ่งแวดล้อม

สารคดียาว 103 นาทีนี้เปิดตัวในวันที่ 28 กุมภาพันธ์ที่ผ่านมา เพียงวันแรกมีผู้คนเข้าไปคลิกในเว๊บไซต์วิดีโอของจีน เช่น Youku ถึง 75 ล้านคลิก สองวันต่อมามีการเปิดเข้าไปดู 200 ล้านครั้ง เป็นสถิติใหม่ของสารคดีที่มีความยาวและมีเนื้อหาที่จริงจัง ถ้าจะเปรียบเทียบ house of cards ภาพยนตร์ชุดแนวการเมืองที่นิยมมากในสหรัฐมีการคลิก 20 ล้านเมื่อออกอากาศในจีนในช่วงสัปดาห์แรก

ในปี 2013 ลูกสาวในครรภ์ของ Chai ตรวจพบว่ามีเนื้องอก โชคดีที่ไม่ร้ายแรงมากและการรักษาหลังคลอดก็เป็นไปได้ด้วยดี Chai ลาออกจากงานในปี 2014 เพื่อดูแลลูกสาวของเธอ

Chai เป็นหนึ่งในอดีตนักข่าวแนวสืบสวนสอบสวนที่ได้รับความน่าเชื่อถือมากที่สุดของสถานีโทรทัศน์ CCTV หนังสือบันทึกความทรงจำของการทำงานที่สถานีโทรทัศน์เป็นหนังสือที่ขายดีในปี 2013 ส่วนแบ่งจากการเขียนหนังสือเล่มนั้นนำมาใช้ในการทำสารคดี

เมื่อหมอกควันพิษในปักกิ่งมีความเข้มข้นมากขึ้น ความโกรธของ Chai ยิ่งเพิ่มขึ้นเพราะเธอพบว่ามีความยากขึ้นที่จะใช้ชีวิตอย่างปกติกับลูกน้อยที่เพิ่งลืมดูโลก

เธอกล่าวว่า “หมอกควันพิษเข้าปกคลุมชีวิตทั้งชีวิตของเรา” นครปักกิ่งมีวันที่หมอกควันพิษปกคลุม 175 วันในปี 2014 “ครึ่งปีที่ฉันต้องเก็บลูกสาวไว้ดังเช่นนักโทษ”

ในตอนเช้า บางครั้งฉันจะพบเธอยืนที่หน้าต่าง วางมือไว้ที่กระจก พยายามจะแสดงให้ฉันรู้ว่าเธออยากไปข้างนอก“

ชื่อสารคดีอิงจากชื่อนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์ของอเมริกาและภาพยนตร์ชุด ที่เขียนโดยสตีเฟนคิง นักเขียนนวนิยายขายดี เป็นเรื่องเกี่ยวกับสนามพลังลึกลับและมองไม่เห็นที่คืบคลานเข้าสู่เมืองเล็กๆ กักขังเอาชาวเมืองไว้ข้างในและตัดขาดพวกเขาออกจากอารยธรรม

Chai ตัดสินใจสำรวจปัญหามลพิษทางอากาศอันเรื้อรังของจีน เธออธิบายว่าทุกๆ สิ่งที่ทำก็เพื่อที่ตอบคำถามที่เธอจะถาม อะไรคือหมอกควันพิษ(Smog) มันมาจากไหน เราทำอะไรได้บ้าง

เพื่อหาคำตอบให้กับคำถามเหล่านี้ เธอต้องเดินทางไปยังพื้นที่ปนเปื้อนมลพิษทั่วประเทศจีน นอกจากนี้ยังเดินไปลอส แองเจลีส และลอนดอนเพื่อหาคำตอยว่าเมื่อเหล่านี้จัดการกับมลพิษทางอากาศอย่างไร

สารคดี ’Under the Dome’ อธิบายว่าหมอกควันพิษ(Smog)คืออะไร อันตรายของมัน มันเกิดขึ้นได้อย่างไรและปัญหาในการจัดการกับหมอกควันพิษ รวมถึงว่าเราแต่ะคนทำอะไรได้บ้าง Chaiบอกว่าหมอกควันพิษเป็นเรื่องที่เกี่ยวข้องกับพลังงานซะเป็นส่วนใหญ่ ร้อยละ 60 ของมลพิษที่อากาศในกรณีภายในประเทศจีนมาจากการเผาใหม้ถ่านหินและน้ำมันเพื่อผลิตไฟฟ้า และในปี 2013 จีนเผาใหม้ถ่านหินมากกว่าทุกประเทศรวมกัน Chai ยังชี้ให้เห็นถึงความล้มเหลวของระบบและการจัดการมลพิษทางอากาศและหมอกควันพิษนี้

คำถามเรื่องสิ่งแวดล้อมและการเจริญเติบโต

ในการสัมภาษณ์กับ People.com.cn Chai กล่าวว่าที่ผ่านมารายงานข่าวของเธอเรื่องหมอกควันพิษนั้นตรงตามข้อเท็จจริง รายงานข่าวเรื่องบริษัทผู้ก่อมลพิษ หรือรัฐบาลท้องถิ่นที่ต้องการจะพัฒนาเศรษฐกิจ และตัวเธอเองก็ไม่แน่ใจ เราต้องการการเจริญเติบโต หรือการปกป้องสิ่งแวดล้อม

แต่การทำงานสืบสวนเรื่องราวในสารคดีนี้ เธอรู้สึกว่าไม่มีความย้อนแย้งระหว่างสองสิ่งนั้น มลพิษทางอากาศมิใช่ผลของการปฏิรูปหรือการเปิดกว้าง และจริงๆ แล้วการปฏิรูปตลาดอย่างเต็มที่นั้นจำเป็นอย่างยิ่งเพื่อแก้ปัญหานี้

ในมุมมองของเธอ การปกป้องสิ่งแวดล้อมนั้นมิใช่ภาระ สำหรับ Chai กฎหมายที่คำนึงถึงสิ่งแวดล้อมมากขึ้นคือแหล่งของนวัตกรรมที่จะส่งเสริมความสามารถในการแข่งขัน การจ้างงานและการเจริญเติบโตทางเศรษฐกิจ ประสบการณ์จากหลายประเทศทั่วโลกสนับสนุนมุมมองดังกล่าวของเธอ

จากการอธิบายของ Chai ปัญหาของหมอกควันพิษจัดการได้หากรัฐบาลลดการแทรกแซงที่ไม่จำเป็นลงและปล่อยให้ตลาดเป็นผู้มีบทบาทในการจัดสรรทรัพยากร บทบาทของรัฐบาลที่จำเป็นคือการออกนโยบายและบังคับใช้กฏหมาย ตลาดที่มีการแข่งขันและมีความเป็นธรรมจะช่วยกระจายทางออกที่สร้างสรรค์ในการแก้ปัญหามลพิษ ทั้งหลายเหล่านี้เป็นไปในทิศทางเดียวกันกับการปฏิรูปของจีนในปัจจุบัน

Chai ส่งเอกสารและสื่อที่เธอรวมรวมในช่วงที่ถ่ายทำสารคดีไปให้คณะกรรมการที่ร่างการทบทวนกฏหมายมลพิษทางอากาศของจีน เธอยังได้รับการตอบรับเมื่อเธอส่งเอกสารและสื่อชุดเดียวกันไปให้คณะทำงานเพื่อการปฏิรูปอุตสาหกรรมก๊าซธรรมชาติและน้ำมันของจีน

เงื่อนเวลา

The Sina columnist Entertainment Capitalism ชมเชยงานสารคดีชิ้นเอกของเธอในการที่ดึงดูดความสนใจของผู้คนก่อนที่จะมีการประชุมประจำปีของผู็นำสูงสุดของพรรคคอมมิวนิสต์จีน หรือที่เรียกกันในภาษจีนว่า ‘Lianghui’

Cao Jingxing นักวิพากษ์ที่โด่งดังจาก Phoenix TV commentator ส่งข้อความทวีตว่า “ขอบคุณ Chai Jing สมาชิก ตัวแทน และเจ้าหน้าที่คณะกรรมการทุกชุดที่ Lianghui ควรดูสารคดีนี้”

อย่างไรก็ตาม ภาพยนตร์สารคดีของ Chai ก็มีคนวิจารณ์ ผู้ซึ่งกล่าวว่า มันไม่เป็นวิทยาศาสตร์ที่จะระบุว่าปัญหาสุขภาพของลูกสาวเธอมาจากผลกระทบของหมอกควันพิษ และการใช้กรณีของลูกสาวเธอ ทำให้สารคดีสืบสวนสอบสวนนั้นมีน้ำหนักน้อยลง

Cui Yongyuan ผู้ประกาศข่าวและอดีตเพื่อนร่วมงานของ Chai ที่สถานีโทรทัศน์ CCTV บอกกับสื่อมวลชนว่า Chai จะเจอกับการโจมตีด้วยคำถามและการกล่าวหาให้เสียหายทางออนไลน์ ปีก่อน Cui ทำงานสารคดี ‘The Gene Report’ ที่ใช้เงินทุนของตัวเองเพื่อตั้งคำถามเรื่องความปลอดภัยของอาหารจีเอ็มโอ ข้อคันพบของเขานั้นถูกโจมตีจากเจ้าหน้าที่รัฐบาล

Cui เพิ่มเติมว่า สารคดีสองเรื่องนั้นส่งผลสะเทือนต่อผลประโยชน์ หากเจ้าหน้าที่รัฐหรือบริษัทต้องขายหน้า และถ้าพวกเขาต้องสูญเสียเงินหรือไม่มีการเลื่อนตำแหน่ง พวกเขาจะโจมตีคุณ

ฤดูใบไม้ผลิที่เงียบเหงาแห่งจีน?

ความรู้สึกร่วมจากสารคดีของ Chai ได้ทำให้นักวิจารณ์ในจีนประหลาดใจ Li Jiangtao นักวิชาการอาวุโสที่สถาบันเศรษฐศาสตร์ มหาวิทยาลัย Tsinghua กล่าวในบทความของเขาว่า ปัจจัยสามประการที่ทำให้ภาพยนตร์สารคดีนี้มีความน่าสนใจต่อผู้ชมคือ เหตการณ์ใหญ่ๆ (หมอกควันพิษในจีน) มุมแรงๆ ที่นำเสนอเรื่องมนุษย์ที่โยงกับผู้ประกาศข่าวโทรทัศน์ที่มีชื่อเสียง และความตื่นตัวที่เพิ่มมากขึ้นในเรื่องสิ่งแวดล้อม

Li ระบุว่า ช่วงเวลาการนำเสนอนั้นก็ยิ่งน่าสนใจ พรรคคอมมิวนิสต์จีนได้มีการประชุมสูงสุด การแต่งตั้งนาย Chen Jining รัฐมนตรีสิ่งแวดล้อม และการรณรงค์ต่อต้านคอรัปชั่นของผู้นำจีน

Chen กล่าวว่า เมื่อดูสารคดีทำให้นึกย้อนถึงความตระหนักด้านสิ่งแวดล้อมในระดับโลกตอนที่หนังสือ “ความเงียบในฤดูใบไม้ผลิ Silent Spring ของราเชล คาร์สันตีพิมพ์ออกมาในปี 1962 และสารคดีของ Chai มีนัยะสำคัญอย่างยิ่งในการยกระดับความตื่นตัวของสาธารณะชนในเรื่องสิ่งแวดล้อมและผลกระทบสุขภาพที่เกิดขึ้นจากมลพิษ

Chen กล่าวว่ากระทรวงของเขาและสื่อมวลชนนั้นอยู่ข้างเดียวกัน และภาพยนตร์สารคดี ‘Under the Dome’ แสดงถึงปฏิสัมพันธ์ระหว่างรัฐบาล สังคมและสื่อมวลชน

ผลสะเทือนของสารคดียังเกิดขึ้นต่อตลาดหลักทรัพย์ของจีนอีกด้วย โดยที่ส่วนแบ่งตลาดของบริษัทธุรกิจอุปกรณ์ลดมลพิษนั้นเพิ่มขึ้น ทำให้หุ้นของบริษัทเทคโนโลยีสิ่งแวดล้อมจำนวนหนึ่งเพิ่มขึ้นกว่าขอบเขตที่มีการซื้อขายกัน

Smog Shrouds Eastern China

Chinahaze_tmo_2013341

China suffered another severe bout of air pollution in December 2013. When the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this image on December 7, 2013, thick haze stretched from Beijing to Shanghai, a distance of about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles). For comparison, that is about the distance between Boston, Massachusetts, and Raleigh, North Carolina. The brightest areas are clouds or fog. Polluted air appears gray. While northeastern China often faces outbreaks of extreme smog, it is less common for pollution to spread so far south.

“The fog has a smooth surface on the top, which distinguishes it from mid- and high-level clouds that are more textured and have distinct shadows on their edge,” explained Rudolf Husar, director of the Center for Air Pollution Impact and Trend Analysis at Washington University. “If there is a significant haze layer on top of the fog, it appears brownish. In this case, most of the fog over eastern China is free of elevated haze, and most of the pollution is trapped in the shallow winter boundary layer of a few hundred meters.”

On the day this natural-color image was acquired by Terra, ground-based sensors at U.S. embassies in Beijing and Shanghai reported PM2.5 measurements as high as 480 and 355 micrograms per cubic meter of air respectively. The World Health Organization considers PM2.5 levels to be safe when they are below 25.

Fine, airborne particulate matter (PM) smaller than 2.5 microns (about one thirtieth the width of a human hair) is considered dangerous because it is small enough to enter the passages of the human lungs. Most PM2.5 aerosol particles come from the burning of fossil fuels and of biomass (wood fires and agricultural burning).

At the time of the satellite image, the air quality index (AQI) reached 487 in Beijing and 404 in Shanghai. An AQI above 300 is considered hazardous to all humans, not just those with heart or lung ailments. AQI below 50 is considered good.

In some cities, authorities ordered school children to stay indoors, pulled government vehicles off the road, and halted construction in an attempt to reduce the smog, according to news reports.

  1. References

  2. Associated Press, via The Washington Post (2013, December 6) Smog at Extremely Hazardous levels in Shanghai.Accessed December 9, 2013.
  3. Bloomberg News (2013, December 9) Shanghai Tells Children to Stay Inside for Seventh Day on Smog. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  4. The New York Times (2013, December 5) Air Pollution Shrouds Eastern China. Accessed Accessed December 9, 2013.
  5. U.S. Department of State (2013, December 9) U.S. Consulate Shanghai Air Quality Monitor. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  6. U.S. Department of State (2013, December 9) U.S Embassy Beijing Air Quality Monitor. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  7. Voice of America (2013, December 6) Flights Delayed as Air Pollution Hits Record in Shanghai. Accessed December 9, 2013.
  8. Xinhua (2013, December 9) Cities hit hard by smog. Accessed December 9, 2013.

NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE MODIS Rapid Response. Caption by Adam Voiland.

NASA – New Map Offers a Global View of Health-Sapping Air Pollution

NASA – New Map Offers a Global View of Health-Sapping Air Pollution.